Just So

willow patternsThis week, if:book Australia is proud to publish a series of remixes from its 24-Hour Book, Willow Pattern. The source material for the remixes goes well beyond the finished text of the book to include the entire database of edits collected over the project’s duration.

Sandra Thibodeaux has created a poem inspired by the data from Willow Pattern and the true story of a missing child.

 


 

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Read the complete poem at the Willow Patterns remix showcase. Continue Reading →

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The Leak

This week, if:book Australia is proud to publish a series of remixes from its 24-Hour Book, Willow Pattern. The source material for the remixes goes well beyond the finished text of the book to include the entire database of edits collected over the project’s duration.

 

 

Nathan Curnow‘s The Leak is a cento poem, stitched together from quotes, paraphrases, and references culled from the book’s data and, in the process, transformed into something new. The poem is available in both text and audio forms where each reference to the original author has been meticulously annotated.

 

Read The Leak by Nathan Curnow in text at willowpatterns.net

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I Will Say This Only Once

willow patternsThis week, if:book Australia is proud to publish a series of remixes from its 24-Hour Book, Willow Pattern. The source material for the remixes goes well beyond the finished text of the book to include the entire database of edits collected over the project’s duration.

More about Willow Pattern, the 24-Hour Book.

More about Willow Patterns, the open database of edits from the original 24-Hour Book.

Pascalle Burton has created a sound collage called I Will Say This Only Once, featuring all 3,500 words used just once in the book’s text.

 

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What Does This Mean For Books?!?!?

Industrial music for an industry-focused penultimate podcast for 2013. In a break with tradition, Simon and Emily discuss topical events, though they also take time to air aversion to panicky blog posts that find tenuous links between random world events and implications for books.

The District Court of the Southern District of New York has handed down judgement in the long-running Google Books class action law suit. We pick apart what this means and what people have said about it.

Amazon have decided to use their long-dormant Australian domain to sell Kindle books. The most profound implication for Australian authors putting their work out through Kindle Direct Publishing is the ability to claim a 70% royalty rate for sales within Australia. So that’s nice.

Finally in lieu of a more traditional Cool Stuff We Found On The Internet™, Simon attempts to share some insights from his recent visit to San Francisco and the Books in Browsers conference therein.

Featured artist for this episode is Mic Freak aka Mike Cobaria and his industrial groove track Rock Solid.

 

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Podcast Feed // iTunes

 

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Kirsty 4. The End Of The Adventure

I opened a word document to type out this blog about 5 hours before any words were actually put onto the page. No, it was not procrastination (well, okay, a little bit) it was technical difficulties. First, I was busily searching for a reference point for my original topic of research methods. As I was browsing the crazy, wonderful world of the internet my modem cut out. This happened

Poem – A Clay Embrace

A poem by Kat in response to Emily's This Tree Is Not Like The Others The clay soil has hardened as it dried. It catches under my nails, chipping and breaking them as I dig. The skin of my fingers catch on the rocks and debris hidden in amongst the soil. I imagine my blood being kneaded into the displaced clay, an offering to the earth I’m going to join with. If I could still feel my

Kat 4. A Sneaky Peek Behind The Curtain

If you’ve had a chance to look at the fantastic interviews from the Willow Pattern authors, you may have noticed some differing opinions about the end product. For Rjurik Davidson, participating allowed him to explore new styles of writing, stripping away the literary frills and letting the story speak for itself. For Krissy Kneen and Nick Earls, the end product wasn’t necessarily such a

Dazzled by the Undoable

the noobzHello. My name is Ronnie and this is the story of how I failed to draw a comic. Throughout this process, I tried to illustrate various colours, shapes, and lines. What I ended up illustrating is a trio of clichés: those who can’t do teach; it’s harder to make than to criticise; and scholars tend to be somewhat divorced from their research topics. Please, make yourself comfortable and watch a grown man drown before your eyes.

I sometimes get to work as a comics critic, which I love: it’s Chris Ware who said that comics is the only art form where you have to explain the medium’s history before addressing a single one, so I often get to editorialise and soapbox and opine before digging into the comic at hand—usually a big no. Meanwhile, my doctoral thesis, which I spent four years of my life writing, was basically an attempt to redefine comics as an art of space, rather than an art of time. It was the kind of supernerdy, fine-grained study that only its author could love, but one detail is germane here: I don’t believe my own argument; it’s an opening gambit, a bargaining position, a thesissy point of departure, one that allowed me to get into the guts of why comics is uniquely itself. Comics’ engagement with space and time, how it messes them both up, is different to the dimensional engagement of any other narrative form. Continue Reading →

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An Interview With P.M. Newton

I think we owe P.M. Newton a thank you and an apology for her interview. We honestly didn't mean to bring up the bad memories. * 1. What made you decide to be apart of the Willow Pattern project?  The people organizing it. I am a big admirer of Queensland Writers Centre and the people who work there. Add to that the writers they were inviting to take part and I was prepared to say yes.